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Deer on the move: Motorists use caution!

Jack Danchak - Columnist
Posted 10/31/19

Deer are becoming increasingly active and daylight saving time will soon end (November 3) which will increase vehicle traffic between dusk and dawn, the peak hours of deer activity.

Deer become …

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Deer on the move: Motorists use caution!

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Deer are becoming increasingly active and daylight saving time will soon end (November 3) which will increase vehicle traffic between dusk and dawn, the peak hours of deer activity.

Deer become more active at this time of the year with the lead-up to their fall breeding season, commonly referred to as the “Rut.” Around this time of the year, many yearling bucks disperse from the areas in which they were born and start to travel further distances to find new ranges. Meanwhile, adult bucks more often are cruising their home ranges in search of does in heat and they often chase does they encounter across roads.

The peak of the rut is not quite here yet but deer already have increased their activity and are crossing roads. Motorists are advised to stay alert and be on the lookout for deer while driving, it's especially important now and the coming weeks.

Drivers can reduce their chances of collisions with deer by staying alert and better understanding deer behavior. Pay attention while driving on stretches marked with “Deer Crossing” signs, it can make a big difference and prevent an accident.

Deer often travel in family groups and walk in single file. So even if one deer successfully crosses the road in front of a driver, it doesn't mean the threat is over, another could be right behind it.

If a deer is struck by a vehicle, but not killed, drivers are urged to maintain their distance because some deer might recover and move on.

However, if a deer does not move on or poses a public safety risk, drivers are encouraged to report the incident to a DEC Regional Office or other law-enforcement agency. If the deer must be put down, the proper authorities will do so.

Precautions

against a virus!

The Pennsylvania Game Commission is encouraging hunters and others who spend time outdoors to take precautions against mosquito bites and to report to the Game Commission any strange-acting wild animals they believe that may be infected by this rare mosquito-transmitted virus called “Eastern Equire Encephalitis (EEE).

This virus has been documented in wildlife and livestock in Pennsylvania in recent weeks. It's been found in two wild turkeys, a wild deer, captive pheasants and horses.

No human cases have been reported in Pa but the disease, which is similar to West Nile virus, can infect humans.

To reduce the potential of contracting EEE, use insect repellent when outdoors and cover up exposed skin, especially at dusk when mosquitoes are most active. Standing water around homes should be removed because mosquitoes lay their eggs in water.

Jack Danchak is the President of the Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs of Sullivan County.

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