Log in Subscribe

No one is being held hostage

Jeanne Sager - Columnist
Posted 5/18/20

There's been a fire swell of support of late for something I like to call the “if you try hard enough to believe, it seems like it could be true” phenomenon.

I'm talking about the claims that …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

No one is being held hostage

Posted

There's been a fire swell of support of late for something I like to call the “if you try hard enough to believe, it seems like it could be true” phenomenon.

I'm talking about the claims that we're being held hostage in our homes in light of the COVID-19 epidemic as well as state and local rules limiting our movements to essential goings on.

We're not supposed to go out and about unless we really need to, whether it's for a job that's been deemed essential or for the life-sustaining necessities such as food, medicines, and healthcare. We're not supposed to spend time in close proximity to others. We're not supposed to use public playgrounds or some areas where there is no means to use social distance.

These are limitations we're not used to, sure.

But held hostage? Not even close.

I've read the rules. I follow them rigorously.

And in the past few weeks, as the weather has warmed up, I've been able to see a few friends from a reasonable social distance, even spending Saturday afternoon stopping off at Kauneonga Lake's The Local Table and Tap for a delicious take-out lunch, which we enjoyed together but apart in the town square, spaced out more than six feet from one another. We missed our hugs hello and goodbye. We had to speak slightly louder than usual. We kept our masks ‘round our necks in case anyone came close and rose them up into position for the pick-up portion of the whole deal.

We were smart, careful, and followed the rules to the T.

We were also perfectly free to do so.

This was by no means an outlier. Thanks again to the warming of the weather, I've taken to walking my neighborhood with my husband, daughter, and our dogs to enjoy the fresh air. We stroll down the street and if we see someone, we steer a wide socially distanced berth. We never touch anyone. We never even come close.

We're not in danger, and almost as importantly — if not more — we don't put anyone else in danger.

We are limited, of course.

We take our lunch out from our favorite eatery rather than eating inside. We put on masks when necessary for our own safety and everyone else's. We don't stop to chat with the neighbors and pet their pup. We don't get to touch our friends or share our food.

But if fresh air walks and outdoor picnics with friends were what it meant to be “held hostage,” something tells me hostage negotiators would be out of a job.

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here