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Should we really just agree to disagree?

Jeanne Sager - Columnist
Posted 11/2/20

Agree to disagree. On their face, the three words sound reasonable enough, like “let bygones be bygones” or “give peace a chance.”

We could all use a little more agreement in our lives. …

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Should we really just agree to disagree?

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Agree to disagree. On their face, the three words sound reasonable enough, like “let bygones be bygones” or “give peace a chance.”

We could all use a little more agreement in our lives.

But when it comes time to pick a politician, should we really agree to disagree with our friends and family?

Here's just a smattering of the things politicians — at least those on the federal level — have the power to determine:

• Whether or not our troops will be sent into harm's way

• Who should sit on the Supreme Court - should Roe v. Wade be challenged again

• What protections are afforded gay people, transgender people, women, people of color, and other minorities under federal discrimination laws

• What regulations — if any — should be levied against private businesses in the interest of protecting the environment

• What sorts of regulations — again, if any — should surround the production of our foods, our medicines, our motor vehicles, and more

• Who does and does not qualify for asylum in our country

• Tax rates

• Foreign policy

• The future of our Constitution

• The future of our nation

Whether all or even any of these matters is important to you is a personal decision. Even for those who find them all to be important, the ranking may vary. A transgender person may rank discrimination policies above foreign policy, for example, a parent of a soldier may rank the power to declare war over environmental protections.

But all of these issues affect human lives, some in more significant ways than others.

They affect lives so directly that we are given the power to go to the ballot box and cast our vote on the person we see most fit to make these life altering decisions on our behalf.

Chances are at least a few of these matters will be considered when you make your choice (or if you already made it, when you did so). Chances are at least a few of these matters count a whole heck of a lot to you, no matter which side of the political aisle you sit on.

These decisions matter.

They change lives.

They guide you in making the important decision of who to vote for.

If they're that important on election day, shouldn't they be that important the day after too?

Are you still sure you can just agree to disagree?

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